Reading Merit Badge Guide

reading merit badge guide

Reading Merit Badge – Maybe you have enjoyed books, magazines, and the internet for years, without ever thinking of reading as a skill you have mastered, just as carpenters who build the frameworks of houses use skills the have mastered.

When you first went to school (whether you knew it at the time), your teacher’s most important goal was teaching you how to read.

Reading specialists have developed countless ways to teach reading. You were taught by one method or maybe more than one, especially if your family moved and you changed schools.

What were you learning as you began to master the skill of reading? Basically, reading is making sense out of symbols that in combinations become words and in combinations of words become sentences.

Over time, you identify the symbols or letters without being consciously aware that you are making an identification. When you see as a g. You learned the meaning of that symbol.

Reading Merit Badge Requirements

reading merit badge requirement
1. Do EACH of the following:
(a) Take a tour of a library. Discuss with your counselor how the library is organized and what resources and/or services are offered in the library.

(b) Learn how to search a library’s card catalog or computerized catalog by author, title, and subject.

(c) In a library, search the card catalog or computerized catalog for six books of four different types, such as poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and biographies.

(d) With the assistance of your merit badge counselor or the librarian, see if you can locate on the shelves the six books you selected.

(e) Explain what is a library card, why it is needed, and how to get one.
2. Do EACH of the following:
(a) Identify a book you have enjoyed. Find out what other books the author has written.

(b) Look at one or more “best books” lists. These can be based on year, subject, or even all time. Identify at least one book you would like to read.
3. Read four different types of books, such as poetry, fiction, nonfiction, or biographies. Do any ONE of the following for each book you have read:
(a) Write a review of the book. Include what you liked/didn’t like about the book. Include if you would recommend this book, and if so, who might enjoy reading it.

(b) Watch a movie based on the book. What was the same between the book and movie? What was different? Which did you enjoy more? Discuss this with your merit badge counselor.

(c) Give a “book talk” to your class, troop, or patrol.
4. Read a nonfiction book or magazine that teaches you how to do something like cooking, wood-building projects, video game design, science experiments, knot-tying, etc. With your counselor’s and parent’s or guardian’s permission, complete a project from the book. Share your experience with your merit badge counselor. Reading a merit badge pamphlet will not count toward completing this requirement.
5. Read about the world around you from any two sources: books, magazines, newspapers, the internet (with your parent’s or guardian’s permission), field manuals, etc. Topics may include Scouting, sports, environmental problems, politics, social issues, current events, nature, religion, etc. Discuss what you have learned with your counselor.
6. With your counselor’s and parent’s or guardian’s permission, choose ONE of the following activities and devote at least four hours of service to that activity. Discuss your participation with your counselor.
(a) Read to a sick, blind, or homebound person in a hospital or in an extended-care facility.

(b) Perform volunteer work at your school library or a public library.

(c) Read stories to younger children, in a group or individually.

(d) Organize a book swap in your troop, school, or place of worship.

(e) Organize a book drive to collect books. Donate them to an organization in need.

Reading for Information

For requirement 2 you will research subjects that interest you. You can pick any current topic, but your reading selections for requirement 2 will be mostly, if not entirely, nonfiction.

You are looking for facts and information. Your goal is to learn about the world around you by reading the most accurate and up-to-date sources you can find.

Your search probably will take you back to the library, where you will find a great variety of materials-not only books, but also newspapers, magazines, videos, CDs, maps, photographs, online resources, and more.

1. What Do You Want to Know?

Maybe there is some particular topic you have wanted to learn about but have never found anybody to ask. Or perhaps there is a topic with which you are familiar but want to know more about.

Or there is something you want to want to know how to do or make. Whatever subject interests you, you’re almost certain to find that many people have written about it.

Here are some examples of topics many young people are curious about. If your choice is not on the list, add it!

  • Mysteries such as the Loch Ness monster, crop circles, Stonehenge
  • Fossils and dinosaurs
  • Mummies and ancient Egypt
  • Castles, knights, the Middle Ages
  • Politics and world events
  • Nations, cultures, religions
  • Sports and athletes
  • Travel and faraway places
  • Music, art, photography, movies
  • Careers
  • Colleges and universities
  • Animals and nature
  • Robots, computers, electronics
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Machines, automobiles, aircraft
  • Earthquakes, volcanoes, other natural disasters
  • Ocean exploration, living beneath the sea
  • Astronomy, Hubble Space Telescope
  • Asteroids, comets, near-Earth object (NEOs)
  • Environmental issues
  • Living in space, International Space Station
  • The outdoor, hiking, camping
  • Famous people
  • Wilderness survival
  • Fitness and health
  • How to handle problems of growing up, peer approval and pressure, self-esteem
  • How to deal with family issues, problems, divorce, substance abuse

2. Reading to Know

With your topic in mind, you’re ready to find your sources and read up on it. Here’s a look at some different resources you might use.

  • Encyclopedias. A general encyclopedia will give you basic facts or background information about many subjects. Information can change quickly, so use a good, up-to-date encyclopedia, whether it’s printed in 30 volumes or contained on a single compact disc.
  • Specialized Reference Works. Reference books, electronic databases, and other general information sources help organize vast amounts of information to make specific facts faster and easier to find.
  • Magazines and Newspapers. For the most up-to-date coverage of your subject, read articles and editorials in magazines and newspapers. Your library probably has a selection of general interest magazines and local or major newspapers from which to choose the part of your reading for requirement 2.
  • Books. Books have been written about every subject. Search for them using either the library card catalog or computerized catalog as you learned for requirement 1a.
  • Internet. The internet is a vast collection of information. Get your parent’s permission to use the internet and ask your parent, counselor, or librarian to help you find what you need.

3. Getting the Facts

For requirement 1, the goal of your reading was a pleasure. You read for fun. You will also have fun, of course, with your reading for requirement 2. But what you are mainly after now is information.

To get it, you may dip into various sources, reading parts of them but not reading them all cover to cover.

You wouldn’t read an entire guidebook about the Everglades, you wouldn’t need to read every article in a magazine to get the one story in it about your chosen topic.

On the other hand, you have to pay attention when you are reading for information. Take time to be sure you understand what you are reading. Ask yourself:

  • What key ideas and specific facts have i learned from this article (or page, paragraph, chapter, etc.)?
  • Do I understand these ideas and what they mean?
  • Do they answer my questions about this subject?

Re-read any part that is not clear to you. Take notes to help you keep track of what you understand and what you don’t, and to identify which of your questions have been answered and which have not.

Something you read may raise new questions, sending you off to other resources in search of the answers.

4. The Power of Words

Mark Twain remarked: “A powerful agent is the right word. Whenever we come upon one of those intensely right words in a book or a newspaper the resulting effect is physical as well as spiritual, and electrically prompt.”

Language is rich with “intensely right words.” As you read, whether for pleasure or to get information, be aware of the words. If you find one you don’t know, look it up in a dictionary or thesaurus.

In your log, keep a “cool words” list. When you come across an interesting new word or a catchy saying or phrase, add it to your list.

You will discover that as your vocabulary grows, reading will become easier and more fun. You will understand more of what you read and you’ll be comfortable reading material written for any age group.

5. Fill in the Blanks

You probably have spent time filling out forms for school, for scouting, for camp, and for other activities.

It is important to be able to read written instructions and follow them closely, whether you’re ordering a magazine subscription or completing a medical history.

If you make a mistake, your magazines may go to the wrong address, or you might get the wrong medical treatment.

Requirement 3a involves completing an order form for merchandise as if you intended to place an order.

Your counselor will go over the completed order form with you, checking to be sure you carefully read and followed the instructions for correctly filling out the form.

You may fill out a paper form from a mail-order catalog, magazine, or other printed item such as a sales flier. You may also fill out an online order form, as long as you are able to print the completed form to share and discuss with your counselor.

Take care to complete the order form neatly and accurately. Show your counselor that you have read the ordering instructions and followed the exactly.

Volunteering for Reading

For requirement 4, you are to give at least four hours of service as a reading volunteer. You will find many opportunities in your community to volunteer your time and your skills as a reader.

Talk with your counselor about the different kinds of volunteer service you might give. Because your counselor can help you match your interests and abilities to the needs of people in your community.

Be sure to get your parent’s permission for your chosen service activity.

1. Reading Aloud

Do you remember being read to when you were a little kid? Did you like it?

For many people, being read to is a favorite memory from childhood. If you have a little brother or sister, or if there are young kids in your neighborhood or your extended family, try reading aloud to them and see how quickly you become their favorite big brother.

Chances are, you’ll have even more fun than they will.

Reading aloud is a different skill from reading to yourself. To keep from losing your audience, you must read slowly. If you’re normally a fast talker, you may have to slow down your reading so much that to your own ears, at least you sound draggy.

Don’t worry. You won’t sound draggy to your listeners. They will follow the story much better if you go slowly, say every word, read with with enthusiasm, and insert a few pauses for dramatic effect.

Reading aloud takes practice. Before you read to an audience (of one listener of many), practice the material your have chosen.

Be sure you can pronounce all the words, including the characters names. Know where to put the pauses. Remember to read aloud the title and the name of the author (and the illustrator, if there is one).

This reminds your listeners where books come from authors write them!

2. Volunteering in a Library

Another way to fulfill requirement 4 is to volunteer in your school or public library. Working in the library will help you become familiar with how books are classified and arranged on the shelves and make it easier for you to find the books you want.

You also will discover other resources available in your library, which might include video, CDs, DVDs, books on tape, maps, photo collections, genealogy, local history collections, and computers.

As a library volunteer, depending on your age and grade level or experience, you might:

  • Mend and cover books.
  • Sort materials.
  • Return books to their proper places on the shelves.
  • Make or update displays, bulletin boards, or scrapbooks.
  • Make signs, posters, and other artwork.
  • Clip newspaper articles for local history files.
  • Stuff envelopes for bulk mailings.
  • Help set up or clean up for book sales and other special events.
  • Assist with programs.
  • Guide younger students in finding library resources to help with homework assignments.
  • Stam date-due cards.
  • Help in the children’s area with crafts and other activities.

Your school or public library probably has many positions open for young-adult volunteers. Just ask. Most librarians are happy to train their volunteer assistants.

Experience is usually not necessary, although computer skills are helpful for some library positions.

The Answer for Requirement Number 1a

I can provide a general idea of how libraries are typically organized and the types of resources and services they commonly offer.

Organization of a Library

Libraries are usually organized in several key ways:

  1. Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC): This is the most common system for classifying books in the library. It divides knowledge into 10 main classes and further divides those into 10 divisions and sections for greater specificity.
  2. Library of Congress Classification (LCC): This is another system used mainly in academic and research libraries. It uses a combination of letters and numbers, and it groups books into 21 broad categories.
  3. Genre and Subject Matter: Within the systems above, books are often grouped by genre or subject matter. For instance, fiction books may be grouped separately from non-fiction, and within non-fiction, you might find sections for history, science, biography, etc.
  4. Media Type: Libraries typically have different areas for different types of media. There might be a section for print books, another for magazines and newspapers, a separate area for DVDs and CDs, and possibly a space for maps and other resources.

Resources and Services Offered

Libraries offer a wide variety of resources and services, including but not limited to:

  1. Book Lending: This is the most basic service. Patrons can check out books to read at home.
  2. Reference Services: Librarians can help patrons find information, suggest books, and assist with research.
  3. Interlibrary Loan: If the library doesn’t have a particular book, they can often get it from another library.
  4. Digital Resources: Many libraries now offer e-books, digital magazines, online databases, and other digital resources.
  5. Programs and Events: Libraries often host events like author talks, book clubs, story times for children, and classes on various topics.
  6. Study and Meeting Spaces: Libraries often provide quiet areas for studying, as well as rooms that can be reserved for meetings or study groups.
  7. Computers and Internet Access: Many libraries provide computers for public use, as well as free Wi-Fi.
  8. Special Collections: Some libraries have collections of rare books, local history resources, or other specialized materials.
  9. Services for Specific Groups: This can include services for children, teens, seniors, non-English speakers, people with disabilities, and others.

Here’s a tabulated summary:

Organizational SystemDescription
Dewey Decimal ClassificationDivides knowledge into 10 main classes, further divided into divisions and sections
Library of Congress ClassificationUses letters and numbers, grouping books into 21 categories
Genre and Subject MatterGroups books by genre or subject matter
Media TypeSeparates areas for different types of media
Library ServicesDescription
Book LendingAllows patrons to check out books for home reading
Reference ServicesProvides help in finding information, suggesting books, and assisting with research
Interlibrary LoanProvides access to books from other libraries if not available locally
Digital ResourcesOffers e-books, digital magazines, online databases, etc.
Programs and EventsHosts events like author talks, book clubs, story times, and classes
Study and Meeting SpacesProvides quiet areas for studying and rooms for meetings or study groups
Computers and Internet AccessProvides computers for public use and free Wi-Fi
Special CollectionsHouses collections of rare books, local history resources

The Answer for Requirement Number 1b

Here’s how you can search a library’s card catalog or computerized catalog by author, title, and subject.

Card Catalog

Traditional card catalogs are organized into three types of cards: author, title, and subject. Here’s how you can search each:

  1. Author: These cards are arranged alphabetically by the author’s last name. To find a book by an author, look under the author’s surname.
  2. Title: Title cards are arranged alphabetically by the first word of the title (excluding “a,” “an,” and “the”). To find a book by title, look under the first significant word of the title.
  3. Subject: Subject cards are also arranged alphabetically. They list the subjects covered by the books in the library. To find a book on a certain topic, look under the topic name.

Computerized Catalog

Most libraries now use computerized catalogs, often called OPACs (Online Public Access Catalogs). These make searching much easier and faster. Here’s how you can search:

  1. Author: Enter the author’s name into the search box, select “author” from the drop-down menu (if available), and hit enter. The system will then display a list of works by that author in the library’s collection.
  2. Title: Enter the title of the book into the search box, select “title” from the drop-down menu (if available), and hit enter. The system will then display the library’s holdings that match that title.
  3. Subject: Enter your desired subject into the search box, select “subject” from the drop-down menu (if available), and hit enter. The system will then display a list of books and other materials related to that subject.

Here’s a tabulated summary:

Search TypeCard CatalogComputerized Catalog
AuthorLook under the author’s last nameEnter the author’s name, select “author,” and hit enter
TitleLook under the first significant word of the titleEnter the title, select “title,” and hit enter
SubjectLook under the topic nameEnter the subject, select “subject,” and hit enter

While the specific design and features of computerized catalogs can vary from library to library, the general principles remain the same. It’s also worth noting that many computerized catalogs have additional search features, such as keyword searches, advanced search options, and the ability to search multiple libraries at once.

The Answer for Requirement Number 1c

I can explain how you might do this task in a library. Let’s say we’re looking for these four types of books: poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and biographies. Here’s a hypothetical example:

Poetry: Search for a specific poet, a collection of poems, or a specific poem. For example, you might search for “Robert Frost” under ‘Author’ or “The Road Not Taken” under ‘Title’.

Fiction: Search for a specific fiction book or author. For instance, you could look for “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee.

Nonfiction: Nonfiction covers a broad range of topics, so you might want to narrow your search. For instance, you might search for “A Brief History of Time” by Stephen Hawking.

Biography: For biographies, you can search for the subject of the biography or the author. For instance, you might search for “The Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne Frank, or “Steve Jobs” by Walter Isaacson.

Here’s a hypothetical tabulated summary of such a search:

Book TypeAuthor SearchTitle Search
PoetryRobert FrostThe Road Not Taken
FictionHarper LeeTo Kill a Mockingbird
NonfictionStephen HawkingA Brief History of Time
BiographyAnne FrankThe Diary of a Young Girl
BiographyWalter IsaacsonSteve Jobs

Remember, when you find a book in the catalog, make note of its call number. This is the “address” that tells you where the book is located in the library.

The Answer for Requirement Number 1d,e

d) Locating Books on the Shelves

Once you have identified the books in the catalog, the next step is to locate them on the shelves. You’ll use the call number from the catalog for this. In most libraries, books are arranged on the shelves according to their call numbers.

For example, if you’re in a library using the Dewey Decimal System, a call number might look like this: 821.7 FRO. The number before the decimal point represents the main class (in this case, 800s for Literature & Rhetoric), the number after the decimal point represents a division within that class (in this case, 821 for English Poetry), and the three-letter code usually represents the author’s last name (in this case, FRO for Frost).

Remember that the librarian or your merit badge counselor can assist you in this process.

e) Library Card

A library card is a card issued by a library to a patron. This card allows the patron to borrow books and other materials, access special services, and sometimes gain access to additional online resources.

Why it is needed

  1. Borrowing Materials: This is the most basic function of a library card. It allows you to check out books, DVDs, and other materials to use outside the library.
  2. Access to Special Services: Some libraries offer additional services like interlibrary loans, the ability to reserve study rooms, or access to specialized research databases, and you may need your library card to use these services.
  3. Online Resources: Many libraries now offer e-books, digital magazines, and other online resources. Your library card often serves as your login for these services.

How to Get One

The process for obtaining a library card varies by library, but generally, it involves the following steps:

  1. Visit the Library: Most libraries require you to apply for a library card in person.
  2. Proof of Address: You’ll usually need to show proof of your current address. This could be a driver’s license, a utility bill, or another official document.
  3. Application Form: You’ll need to complete an application form. This form typically asks for basic information like your name, address, and phone number.
  4. Parental Permission: If you’re under a certain age, you might also need a parent or guardian’s signature.

Once you’ve completed these steps, the library will issue you a library card. It’s a good idea to ask about the library’s lending policies (how many items you can check out, how long you can keep them, etc.) when you receive your card.

Here’s a tabulated summary:

RequirementDescription
Visit the LibraryMost libraries require you to apply for a library card in person
Proof of AddressYou’ll usually need to show proof of your current address
Application FormYou’ll need to complete an application form
Parental PermissionIf you’re under a certain age, you might also need a parent or guardian’s signature

The Answer for Requirement Number 2a,b

a) Identify a book you have enjoyed. Find out what other books the author has written.

Let’s say one of the books you’ve enjoyed is “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” by J.K. Rowling. Here are some other books written by J.K. Rowling:

  1. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
  2. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
  3. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  4. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
  5. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
  6. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  7. The Casual Vacancy (a novel for adults)
  8. Under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith: The Cuckoo’s Calling, The Silkworm, Career of Evil, and Lethal White (a series of detective novels)

b) Look at one or more “best books” lists. These can be based on year, subject, or even all time. Identify at least one book you would like to read.

Let’s consider the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, which is a prestigious award given annually to what’s considered one of the best works of fiction published in that year.

One of the recent winners was “The Overstory” by Richard Powers in 2019. It’s a novel about nine Americans whose unique life experiences with trees bring them together to address the destruction of forests. This book has been highly praised for its sweeping, impassioned work of activism and resistance that is also a stunning evocation of the natural world.

Here’s a tabulated summary:

AuthorEnjoyed BookOther Books by the Same Author
J.K. RowlingHarry Potter and the Sorcerer’s StoneHarry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, The Casual Vacancy, The Cuckoo’s Calling (as Robert Galbraith), The Silkworm (as Robert Galbraith), Career of Evil (as Robert Galbraith), Lethal White (as Robert Galbraith)
Best Books ListSelected Book to Read
Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2019)The Overstory by Richard Powers

The Answer for Requirement Number 3a

I can certainly help you understand how you might go about writing a review for books of different types. Here are some hypothetical examples:

1. Poetry

  • Book: “Leaves of Grass” by Walt Whitman
  • Review: Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” is an iconic collection of poetry that beautifully captures the spirit of American individualism and democracy. The poems, written in free verse, are vibrant, rich in imagery, and filled with a sense of boundless possibility. Some readers may find the language a bit archaic, but the themes of the poems remain relevant today. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in American literature, or those who appreciate contemplative and inspiring poetry.

2. Fiction

  • Book: “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  • Review: “To Kill a Mockingbird” is a powerful exploration of racial injustice, morality, and the loss of innocence, set in the Depression-era South. The story is narrated by young Scout Finch, whose candid observations offer both charm and depth. While the racial themes are uncomfortable, they are also necessary and thought-provoking. This is an important book that I would recommend to readers of all ages, particularly those interested in social justice issues.

3. Nonfiction

  • Book: “Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind” by Yuval Noah Harari
  • Review: “Sapiens” is a sweeping, thought-provoking exploration of the history of humankind. Harari’s writing is clear and engaging, making complex ideas accessible to the general reader. However, some of his assertions are speculative and may not be agreed upon by all scholars in the field. Despite this, the book is a fascinating read that encourages readers to reconsider their understanding of human history. It would be enjoyed by anyone interested in history, anthropology, or philosophy.

4. Biography

  • Book: “The Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne Frank
  • Review: “The Diary of a Young Girl” is a poignant, personal account of Anne Frank’s experiences hiding from the Nazis during World War II. Anne’s voice is authentic, wise beyond her years, and often surprisingly optimistic despite her circumstances. The abrupt end of the diary is a haunting reminder of the realities of the Holocaust. This book is a must-read and would be particularly impactful for young adults learning about World War II history.

Here’s a tabulated summary:

Book TypeBookReviewRecommendation
Poetry“Leaves of Grass” by Walt WhitmanVibrant, rich in imagery, a bit archaic languageAnyone interested in American literature or contemplative and inspiring poetry
Fiction“To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper LeePowerful exploration of racial injustice, morality, and the loss of innocenceReaders of all ages, particularly those interested in social justice issues
Nonfiction“Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind” by Yuval Noah HarariSweeping, thought-provoking exploration of human history, some speculative assertionsAnyone interested in history, anthropology, or philosophy
Biography“The Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne FrankPoignant, personal account of experiences during World War II, haunting reminder of the HolocaustParticularly impactful for young adults learning about World War II history

The Answer for Requirement Number 4

Book: “The Complete Guide to Knots: and How to Tie Them” by Geoffrey Budworth

Project: Tying a Bowline Knot

The bowline knot is an ancient and simple knot used to form a fixed loop at the end of a rope. It has the virtues of being both easy to tie and untie; most notably, it is easy to untie after being subjected to a load.

Step-by-step Instructions:

  1. Make a small loop at the end of the rope.
  2. Bring the end of the rope up through the loop, around the standing line, and back down through the loop.
  3. Pull on the standing line to tighten the knot.

Experience with the Project:

Tying the bowline knot was a fun and practical project. It took a few tries to get it right, but the book’s clear instructions and illustrations were very helpful. This knot could be very useful in a variety of situations, from camping to boating to securing loads. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in learning practical knot-tying skills.

Here’s a tabulated summary:

BookProjectExperience
“The Complete Guide to Knots: and How to Tie Them” by Geoffrey BudworthTying a Bowline KnotThe book provided clear instructions and illustrations for tying the knot. It took a few tries to get it right, but it was a fun and practical project. This knot could be very useful in a variety of situations, from camping to boating to securing loads.

The Answer for Requirement Number 5

I can help you understand how you might approach this requirement based on a hypothetical scenario.

Source 1: Book – “Silent Spring” by Rachel Carson Topic: Environmental Problems What You Might Learn: “Silent Spring” is a groundbreaking book that played a key role in starting the environmental movement. It discusses the harmful effects of pesticides on the environment, particularly on birds. Rachel Carson argues for changes in the way humankind views the natural world.

Source 2: Newspaper – “The New York Times” Topic: Current Events What You Might Learn: Reading a newspaper like “The New York Times” can give you a wide range of current events, from politics to technology to arts and culture. For example, you might learn about the ongoing discussions about climate change, the latest developments in tech industry, or current political debates.

After reading from these two sources, you would discuss what you’ve learned with your counselor. For example, you might discuss the history and impact of the environmental movement as detailed in “Silent Spring,” or how current events in the newspaper connect to your own life and community.

Here’s a tabulated summary:

SourceTopicWhat You Might Learn
“Silent Spring” by Rachel CarsonEnvironmental ProblemsThe harmful effects of pesticides on the environment and the need for changes in the way humankind views the natural world
“The New York Times”Current EventsA wide range of current events, from politics to technology to arts and culture

The Answer for Requirement Number 6

Activity: Organize a book drive to collect books. Donate them to an organization in need.

Steps:

  1. Planning: Decide on the time frame for the book drive and the location for the drop-off point. Make a list of books you’re hoping to collect (e.g., children’s books, novels, textbooks, etc.).
  2. Promotion: Create flyers or posters to advertise your book drive. You could also use social media or word-of-mouth to spread the word.
  3. Collection: Set up collection boxes in agreed locations. Regularly check these drop-off points to collect donated books.
  4. Delivery: Once the book drive is complete, sort through the collected books. Then, deliver them to the chosen organization.

Discussion Points with your Counselor:

  1. Challenges: Discuss any challenges you faced during the organization of the book drive and how you overcame them.
  2. Successes: Share the success of your book drive, how many books you managed to collect and donate.
  3. Impact: Discuss the potential impact of your book drive. For example, how the donated books could benefit the recipient organization and the people they serve.
  4. Learning Experiences: Reflect on what you learned from this activity, such as organizational skills, teamwork, or the importance of literacy and giving back to the community.

Here’s a tabulated summary:

ActivityStepsDiscussion Points with Counselor
Organize a book drive to collect books. Donate them to an organization in need.Planning, Promotion, Collection, DeliveryChallenges, Successes, Impact, Learning Experiences
I might be a Mechanical Engineer on the paper, but I was an Eagle Scout enthusiast since childhood.